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November 2001
©Blackflix.com™
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Table Of Contents
 

TOP 5 U.S.
DISTRIBUTORS

   As of the end of October the current top five domestic distributors of 2001 are as follows:

1.) UNIVERSAL (INCL. FOCUS)
Grossed: $867,699,755
12.89%

2.) PARAMOUNT (INCL. CLASSICS)
Grossed: $791,378,389
11.76%

3.) WARNER BROS.
Grossed: $756,218,938
11.24%

4.) 20TH CENTURY FOX (EXCL. SEARCHLIGHT)
Grossed: $753,025,285
11.19%

5.) BUENA VISTA
Grossed: $655,063,352
9.73%


NBC GOBBLES UP TELEMUNDO

NBC has bought the Spanish-language TV network Telemundo for reportedly $2.7 billion in cash and stocks. On the down side, the Peacock network will also assume Telemundo's $700 million dollar debt.


DISNEY DOWNRATED BY S&P

Standard & Poor's has cut Walt Disney Co.'s credit rating from A to A-, citing the $5.3-billion purchase price that Disney paid for Fox Family Worldwide, a figure many analysts thought was much too high. S&P also cited the huge slide in attendance at Disney theme parks since the Sept. 11 attacks, the slowing economy, the nervousness of advertisers, and the decline in ratings for Disney's ABC Television.


STUDIOS CLOSE MAIL ROOMS

In response to the anthrax scare, Paramount, Disney, Sony and Warner Bros. temporarily halted delivery of all packages and letters to employees. Robert Iger, president and COO of Disney, issued a memo to employees, referring to the anthrax incidents saying, "Due to this news, we have decided to increase the screening of all incoming packages and mail."



LOWE'S STIFFINS SECURITY

Don't try to go into a Lowe's theater to catch a matinee with a shopping bag in your hand. You might not get in. As reported by the New York Daily News, Lowes has instituted a policy at all of its theaters nationwide barring anyone carrying a package larger than the size of a shoebox. Mindy Tucker, a spokeswoman for Loews, told the newspaper that the theater chain is also exploring alternative security procedures. "We are trying to strike the right balance between providing a safe environment for our customers and causing inconvenience for them," she said.


WARNER'S BIG ON DEVELOPMENT

The Los Angeles Times recently reported that Warner Bros. plans to expand its franchise film business by making as many as seven Harry Potter movies, additional Superman and Batman films, Looney Tunes cartoons and new properties including Wonder Woman, Catwoman and follow-ups to this year's hit "Cats and Dogs." Warner Bros. chairman Barry Meyer told the Times, "It's a very long-term business we're developing now. We're devoting more resources toward the early development of these properties and it involves every part of our company."


FORGET TRAILER DOWNLOADS - GRAB THE CD

Believing many people are unwilling to spend the time it takes to download movie trailers and celebrity interviews over the Internet, Santa Monica, CA-based MOD Studios has begun distributing a free CD-ROM magazine to about 200 theaters across the country. New York Times reported that the CD's feature an array of movie previews and celeb interviews. The CD-ROM idea is just one part of an increasing number of marketing campaigns focusing on movie theaters, the newspaper said. It quoted market research exec Andy Greenfield as saying, "The movie theater is normally a wonderful vehicle for advertising, and now it's an unusually wonderful vehicle because of what it represents to people -- an escape."



INDIAN MOVIE GOERS IN U.S. STAY HOME

Audiences for Indian made films showing in the U.S. have practically evaporated since the Sept. 11th attacks, the BBC reported. Taran Adarsh, editor of the publication Trade Guide, told the BBC that many Indians living in the U.S. "are scared to venture out in the cinemas as a result of ... fear of being attacked by some right-wing groups." The BBC also reported that several Indian filmmakers have been forced to cancel location shooting in the U.S. because of safety concerns.


SEPTEMBER 11, ATTACKS MIGHT BE GOOD FOR BUSINESS

The head of the British Cinema Exhibitors' Association has suggested that the current crisis surrounding terrorism could result in a boost in theater attendance worldwide. John Wilkinson told the U.K. trade publication Screen International: "If people stop traveling, the lessons from the past suggest that they do continue to go to the cinema, because it is good value for a night out. They may go to facilities nearer home, which could mean a boost for cinemas. If we were to move into recession that would still hold good."


CURRENT TOP 10
US OPENERS OF 2001

1.) PLANET OF THE APES (20TH CENTURY FOX)
Screens: 3500 Weekend: $68,532,960 Average: $19,581
2.) MUMMY RETURNS, THE (UNIVERSAL)
Screens: 3401 Weekend: $68,139,035 Average: $20,035
3.) RUSH HOUR 2 (NEW LINE)
Screens: 3118 Weekend: $67,408,222 Average: $21,619
4.) PEARL HARBOR (BUENA VISTA)
Screens: 3214 Weekend: $59,078,912 Average: $18,382
5.) HANNIBAL (MGM/UA)
Screens: 3230 Weekend: $58,003,121 Average: $17,958
6.) JURASSIC PARK 3 (UNIVERSAL)
Screens: 3434 Weekend: $50,771,645 Average: $14,785
7.) TOMB RAIDER (PARAMOUNT)
Screens: 3308 Weekend: $47,735,743 Average: $14,430
8.) AMERICAN PIE 2 (UNIVERSAL)
Screens: 3063 Weekend: $45,117,985 Average: $14,730
9.) SHREK (DREAMWORKS)
Screens: 3587 Weekend: $42,347,760 Average: $11,806
10.) FAST AND THE FURIOUS, THE (UNIVERSAL)
Screens: 2628 Weekend: $40,089,015 Average: $15,255